What's this blog about?

I teach several courses under the broad topic of "Multicultural Education," prioritizing social justice issues of access, power/privilege, & narrowing the academic achievement gap. I am a person of color and I almost always have a white co-teacher. We include topics, such as: racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, ethnocentrism, deculturalization, transforming curriculum, etc. This is a place where I post information that we teach; lesson plans for activities; and resources we use and/or which are shared with me by my adult students.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Video to Use for Racial Identity Theory

When you are explaining the "Encounter" phases of William Cross's Racial Identity Development Theory.

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

December 16, 2016 - Updated Bill

(Sec. 2) This bill amends the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (IRFA) to state in the congressional findings that the freedom of thought and religion is understood to protect theistic and non-theistic beliefs as well as the right not to profess or practice any religion.
https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/1150

Saturday, October 1, 2016

Teaching Young Children About Oppression

  1. Find a stereotype that kids know.  
  2. Ask them how they know it?  Where have they seen it?  Help them to identity more than personal reasons (books, movies, TV, magazine, costume shop, etc.).  
  3. Explain: When a stereotype becomes so big that "everyone" knows it, then the system is broken.  It's not just want person making something up, it's all those places (the system) using the same one way (wrong way) of thinking and perpetuating it (keeping it going) so that generation after generation only knows that stereotype and acts on it likes it's the truth (not hiring someone, not teaching someone, not thinking someone is smart or beautiful, etc.).  
  4. When many people keep using a stereotype, it is hurtful to everyone (people have the wrong information which they think is true and act accordingly), and it is oppressive to the people who are stereotyped (they start to believe the lies about themselves, their access and opportunities are limited, etc.)
  5. Oppression is when a stereotype happens in all areas of society and keeps some people from having the same access to things that the people who are not being stereotyped don't have to think about having access to.

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Fran Lebowitz on Race


The way to approach it, I think, is not to ask, “What would it be like to be black?” but to seriously consider what it is like to be white. That’s something white people almost never think about. And what it is like to be white is not to say, “We have to level the playing field,” but to acknowledge that not only do white people own the playing field but they have so designated this plot of land as a playing field to begin with. White people are the playing field. The advantage of being white is so extreme, so overwhelming, so immense, that to use the word “advantage” at all is misleading since it implies a kind of parity that simply does not exist.

It is now common—and I use the word “common” in its every sense—to see interviews with up-and-coming young movie stars whose parents or even grandparents were themselves movie stars. And when the interviewer asks, “Did you find it an advantage to be the child of a major motion-picture star?” the answer is invariably “Well, it gets you in the door, but after that you’ve got to perform, you’re on your own.” This is ludicrous. Getting in the door is pretty much the entire game, especially in movie acting, which is, after all, hardly a profession notable for its rigor. That’s how advantageous it is to be white. It’s as though all white people were the children of movie stars. Everyone gets in the door and then all you have to do is perform at this relatively minimal level.

Additionally, children of movie stars, like white people, have at—or actually in—their fingertips an advantage that is genetic. Because they are literally the progeny of movie stars they look specifically like the movie stars who have preceded them, their parents; they don’t have to convince us that they can be movie stars. We take them instantly at face value. Full face value. They look like their parents, whom we already know to be movie stars. White people look like their parents, whom we already know to be in charge. This is what white people look like—other white people. The owners. The people in charge. That’s the advantage of being white. And that’s the game. So by the time the white person sees the black person standing next to him at what he thinks is the starting line, the black person should be exhausted from his long and arduous trek to the beginning.

Monday, July 4, 2016

Carol Ann Tomlinson and Edwin Lou Javius - Teach Up For Excellence

In a course, Strategies to Close the Achievement Gap, that my colleagues, Elli Stern/Jennifer Wolfrum, and I teach, we ask participants (teachers, counselors, administrators, tutors, nurses, etc.) to get into a group and "become the expert" on an article that we have assigned for homework.  To this end, we then ask the group to construct a graphic organizer, mnemonic, or other visual aid to help "teach" the other groups about the article.  

Joshua Aronson - Knowing Students As Individuals

In a course, Strategies to Close the Achievement Gap, that my colleagues, Elli Stern/Jennifer Wolfrum, and I teach, we ask participants (teachers, counselors, administrators, tutors, nurses, etc.) to get into a group and "become the expert" on an article that we have assigned for homework.  To this end, we then ask the group to construct a graphic organizer, mnemonic, or other visual aid to help "teach" the other groups about the article.  

Pat Guild - The Culture/Learning Style Connection

In a course, Strategies to Close the Achievement Gap, that my colleagues, Elli Stern/Jennifer Wolfrum, and I teach, we ask participants (teachers, counselors, administrators, tutors, nurses, etc.) to get into a group and "become the expert" on an article that we have assigned for homework.  To this end, we then ask the group to construct a graphic organizer, mnemonic, or other visual aid to help "teach" the other groups about the article.  

Willis D. Hawley - Another Inconvenient Truth, Race and Ethnicity Matter

In a course, Strategies to Close the Achievement Gap, that my colleagues, Elli Stern/Jennifer Wolfrum, and I teach, we ask participants (teachers, counselors, administrators, tutors, nurses, etc.) to get into a group and "become the expert" on an article that we have assigned for homework.  To this end, we then ask the group to construct a graphic organizer, mnemonic, or other visual aid to help "teach" the other groups about the article.  

“…teachers need to respect and build on differences to foster student learning.”

“The following practices illustrate the interdependence of good instructional practice and of caring and trustful relationships among students and teachers:
     * Building on students’ prior knowledge, values, and experiences.”
     * Respecting and being interested in students’ experiences and culturalbBackgrounds…….”
             
“…the problem of student underachievement [lay] not in students’ identities or in family culture or poverty, but rather in uncaring school-based relationships…”